Archives

Unsheltered

From the New York Times bestselling author, Barbara Kingsolver, a timely new novel that looks to history as well as to contemporary life to explore the human capacity for resiliency and compassion in times of great uncertainty.

Freefall

A propulsive debut novel for readers of Gone Girl and Before the Fall about survival at all costs and the unbreakable bond between a mother and daughter.

The Oracle Year

Will Dando is your ordinary Brooklyn guy: he’s handsome, smart, dabbles in music (he has a band) and technology. One day he wakes from a dream in which he’s been given 108 specific predictions for the future—about everything from crop futures, to medical diagnoses, to sports scores. Along with his best friends Hamza and his wife Miko, Dando refashions himself The Oracle, and dispenses these predictions to the highest bidder (i.e. hedge funds, politicians) and/or on his Web site. The three get very very rich very, very fast—but then realize that they need to turn their good fortune into good works for the world. But do-gooding is not so easy—especially when lots of other people, including members of the government and a very famous televangelist, want in on Will’s special talent. Like a comic book without the comics, The Oracle Year has a rollicking, colorful style as it follows our hero from New York to Washington to the Middle East as Will and Co. try to make the world a better place. Along the way, they meet a cast of wacky and nefarious characters—and a few good people, too, like the journalist Will finally decides to unburden himself to. Part thriller, part political comedy, part love story, The Oracle Year is one man’s exuberant take on the millennial view of the world.

Magpie Murders

From New York Times bestselling author of Moriarty and Trigger Mortis, this fiendishly brilliant, riveting thriller weaves a classic whodunit worthy of Agatha Christie into a chilling, ingeniously original modern-day mystery. When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different to any of his others. After working with the bestselling crime writer for years, she’s intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. An homage to queens of classic British crime such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, Alan’s traditional formula has proved hugely successful. So successful that Susan must continue to put up with his troubling behavior if she wants to keep her job. Conway’s latest tale has Atticus Pünd investigating a murder at Pye Hall, a local manor house. Yes, there are dead bodies and a host of intriguing suspects, but the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: One of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder. Masterful, clever, and ruthlessly suspenseful, Magpie Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction in which the reader becomes the detective.

Mercury

Donald believes he knows all there is to know about seeing. An optometrist in suburban Boston, he is sure that he and his wife Viv, who runs the local stables, are both devoted to their two children, and to each other. Then Mercury—a gorgeous young thoroughbred with a murky past—arrives at Windy Hill and everything changes. Hilary, a newcomer to town, has inherited Mercury from her brother after his mysterious death. When she first brings Mercury to board at Windy Hill everyone is struck by his beauty and prowess, particularly Viv. As she rides him, Viv begins to dream of competing again, embracing the ambitions that she harbored before she settled for a career in finance. Her daydreams soon morph into consuming desire, and her infatuation with the thoroughbred escalates to obsession. Donald may have 20:20 vision, but he is slow to notice how profoundly Viv has changed and how these changes threaten their quiet, secure world. By the time he does it is too late to stop the catastrophic collision of Viv’s ambitions and his own myopia. Mercury is a riveting tour de force that showcases this “searingly intelligent writer at the height of her powers.” (Jennifer Egan).

Commonwealth

The acclaimed, New York Times bestselling author—winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize—tells the enthralling story of how an unexpected romantic encounter irrevocably changes two families’ lives.

The Comet Seekers

A magical, intoxicating debut novel, both intimate and epic, that intertwines the past, present, and future of two lovers bound by the passing of great comets overhead and a coterie of remarkable ancestors.

One Half from the East

Nadia Hashimi’s first novel for young readers is a coming-of-age journey set in modern Afghanistan that explores life as a bacha posh—a pre-teen girl dressed as a boy.

Obayda’s family is in need of some good fortune, and her aunt has an idea to bring the family luck—dress Obayda, the youngest of her sisters, as a boy, a bacha posh.

Life in this in-between place is confusing, but once Obayda meets another bacha posh, everything changes. Their transformation won’t last forever, though—unless the two best friends can figure out a way to make it stick and make their newfound freedoms endure.

Replica

Two girls, two stories, one epic novel.

From Lauren Oliver, New York Times bestselling author of Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy, comes an epic, masterful novel that explores issues of individuality, identity, and humanity. Replica is a “flip book” that contains two narratives in one. Turn the book one way and read Lyra’s story; turn the book over and upside-down and read Gemma’s story. The stories can be read separately, one after the other, or in alternating chapters. The two distinct parts of this astonishing novel combine to produce an unforgettable journey. Even the innovative book jacket mirrors and extends the reading experience.

Lyra’s story begins in the Haven Institute, a building tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida that from a distance looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth, Haven is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed. When a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects—Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72—manage to escape.

Gemma has been in and out of hospitals for as long as she can remember. A lonely teen, her life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April. But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family’s past and discovers her father’s mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two replicas and a completely new set of questions.

While the stories of Lyra and Gemma mirror each other, each contains breathtaking revelations critically important to the other story. Replica is an ambitious, thought-provoking masterwork.