Archives

Highfire

From the New York Times bestselling author of the Artemis Fowl series comes a hilarious and high-octane adult novel about a vodka-drinking, Flashdance-loving dragon who lives an isolated life in the bayous of Louisiana, and the raucous adventures that ensue when he crosses paths with a 15-year old troublemaker on the run from a crooked sheriff.

142 Ostriches

For lovers of stark beauty, April Dávila’s debut novel explores the muddled love of a desert ranch family long-mired in disconnection and denial. When her grandmother dies under questionable circumstances, a young woman desperate to escape life on her family’s ostrich farm in the Mojave Desert finds herself as the sole heir to the ranch – just as the birds mysteriously stop laying eggs during the peak laying season…
When Tallulah Jones was thirteen, her grandmother plucked her from the dank Oakland apartment she shared with her unreliable mom and brought her to the family ostrich ranch in the Mojave Desert. After eleven years caring for the curious, graceful birds, Tallulah accepts a job in Montana and prepares to leave home. But when Grandma Helen dies under strange circumstances, Tallulah inherits everything—just days before the birds inexplicably stop laying eggs.
Guarding the secret of the suddenly barren birds, Tallulah endeavors to force through a sale of the ranch, a task that is complicated by the arrival of her extended family. Their designs on the property, and deeply rooted dysfunction, threaten Tallulah’s ambitions and eventually her life. With no options left, Tallulah must pull her head out of the sand and face the fifty-year legacy of a family in turmoil: the reality of her grandmother’s death, her mother’s alcoholism, her uncle’s covetous anger, and the 142 ostriches whose lives are in her hands.

Unfollow

A memoir of the author’s experiences growing up in and deciding to leave the Westboro Baptist Church, presented as a series of linked essays.

The Education of an Idealist

Pulitzer-Prize winner Samantha Power is widely known as the moral voice of her generation. A relentless advocate for promoting human rights, she has been heralded by President Barack Obama as one of America’s “foremost thinkers on foreign policy.” The Education of an Idealist traces Power’s distinctly American journey, from Irish immigrant to human rights activist to United States Ambassador to the United Nations. Power began her career as a war correspondent and as a vocal critic of US foreign policy, and then put her ideals into practice while working with Obama in the Senate, on the campaign trail, and throughout his presidency. Power’s perspective on government is unique, as she takes us from the streets of war-torn Bosnia to the Situation Room and out into the world of high-stakes diplomacy. In her characteristically gripping prose, Power illuminates the messy and complex worlds of politics and geopolitics while laying bare the searing battles and defining moments of her life. She also reveals what it’s like to juggle the demands of a 24/7 national security job with raising two young children. And, in the face of great challenges, she shows us not just how the United States can lead, but why there is always something each of us can do to advance the cause of human dignity. The Education of an Idealist is a humorous, stirring, and ultimately unforgettable account of the world-changing power of idealism—and of one person’s fierce determination to make a difference.

Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares

Aarti Shahani shares the dramatic saga of her immigrant family, from the American Dream of coming to the States, to the nightmare of being wrongly accused of money laundering for a notorious drug cartel, and the subsequent fallout from her father’s conviction. Here We Are is the hearing the Shahani family never had and a love letter to Aarti’s father.

Gone at Midnight

A true crime memoir exposing the real story behind one of the most compelling but least understood cases of the century, Gone at Midnight examines an enigmatic tragedy that’s become a cultural obsession and internet phenomenon. The book chronicles the final weeks of Elisa Lam, a 21-year-old Chinese-Canadian student who vanished from the notorious Cecil Hotel in downtown Los Angeles under mysterious circumstances, and explores the unsolved mystery of shocking death.

Motherhood So White

When Nefertiti Austin, a single African-American woman, decided she wanted to adopt a Black baby boy out of the foster care system, she was unprepared for the fact that there is no place for Black women in the “mommy wars.” She soon realized that she would not only have to navigate skepticism from the adoption community, who deal almost exclusively with white women, but surprisingly, from her own family and friends as well. In this unflinching account of her parenting journey, Nefertiti examines the history of adoption in the African American community, faces off against stereotypes of single, Black motherhood, and confronts the reality of raising children of color in racially charged, modern-day America.

Wild Game

On a hot August night on Cape Cod when Adrienne was fourteen, her mother, Malabar, woke her at midnight with five simple words that would set the course of both of their lives for years to come: Ben Souther just kissed me. Adrienne instantly became her mother’s confidante and helpmate, blossoming in the sudden light of her attention, and from then on, Malabar came to rely on her daughter to help orchestrate what would become an epic affair with her husband’s closest friend. The affair would have calamitous consequences for everyone involved, impacting Adrienne’s life in profound ways, driving her into a precarious marriage of her own, and then into a deep depression. Only years later will she find the strength to embrace her life—and her mother—on her own terms.

The Great Pretender

From “one of America’s most courageous young journalists” (NPR) comes a propulsive narrative history investigating the 50-year-old mystery behind a dramatic experiment that changed the course of modern medicine.

The Third Rainbow Girl

A deeply researched and stunningly written investigation of the murder of two young women in 1980––and how the brutal crime has reverberated through a West Virginia community where the author comes to live.