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Liars’ Paradox

A master of international intrigue, New York Times bestselling author Taylor Stevens introduces a pair of wild cards into the global spy game—a brother and sister who were raised to deceive—and trained to kill . . .
They live in the shadows, Jack and Jill, feuding twins who can never stop running. From earliest memory they’ve been taught to hide, to hunt, to survive. Their prowess is outdone only by Clare, who has always been mentor first and mother second. She trained them in the art of espionage, tested their skills in weaponry, surveillance, and sabotage, and sharpened their minds with nerve-wracking psychological games. As they grew older they came to question her motives, her methods—and her sanity . . .
Now twenty-six years old, the twins are trying to lead normal lives. But when Clare’s off-the-grid safehouse explodes and she goes missing, they’re forced to believe the unthinkable: Their mother’s paranoid delusions have been real all along. To find her, they’ll need to set aside their differences; to survive, they’ll have to draw on every skill she’s trained them to use. A twisted trail leads from the CIA, to the KGB, to an underground network of global assassins where hunters become the hunted. Everyone, it seems, wants them dead—and, for one of the twins, it’s a threat that’s frighteningly familiar and dangerously close to home . . .
Filled with explosive action, suspense, and powerful human drama, Liars’ Paradox is world-class intrigue at its finest.

The Red Address Book

Meet Doris, a 96-year-old woman living alone in her Stockholm apartment. She has few visitors, but her weekly Skype calls with Jenny—her American grandniece, and her only relative—give her great joy and remind her of her own youth. When Doris was a girl, she was given an address book by her father, and ever since she has carefully documented everyone she met and loved throughout the years. Looking through the little book now, Doris sees the many crossed-out names of people long gone and is struck by the urge to put pen to paper. In writing down the stories of her colorful past—working as a maid in Sweden, modelling in Paris during the 30s, fleeing to Manhattan at the dawn of the Second World War—can she help Jenny, haunted by a difficult childhood, unlock the secrets of their family and finally look to the future? And whatever became of Allan, the love of Doris’s life? A charming novel that prompts reflection on the stories we all should carry to the next generation, and the surprises in life that can await even the oldest among us, The Red Address Book introduces Sofia Lundberg as a wise—and irresistible—storyteller.

Restoration Heights

Reddick, a young, white artist, lives in Bedford-Stuyvesant, an historically black Brooklyn neighborhood besieged by gentrification. He makes rent as an art handler, hanging expensive works for Manhattan’s one percent, and spends his free time playing basketball at the local Y rather than putting energy into his stagnating career. He is also the last person to see Hannah before she disappears. When Hannah’s fiancé, scion to an old-money Upper East Side family, refuses to call the police, Reddick sets out to learn for himself what happened to her. The search gives him a sense of purpose, pulling him through a dramatic cross-section of the city he never knew existed. But the truth of Hannah’s fate is buried at the heart of a many-layered mystery that, in its unraveling, shakes Reddick’s convictions and lays bare the complicated machinations of money and power that connect the magisterial townhouses of the Upper East Side to the unassuming brownstones of Bed-Stuy. Restoration Heights is both a page-turning mystery and an in-depth study of the psychological fallout and deep racial tensions that result from economic inequality and unrestricted urban development. In lyrical, addictive prose, Wil Medearis asks the question: in a city that prides itself on its diversity and inclusivity, who has the final say over the future? Is it long-standing residents, recent transplants, or whoever happens to have the most money? Timely, thought-provoking, and sweeping in vision, Restoration Heights is an exhilarating new entry in the canon of great Brooklyn novels.

The Silent Patient

Alicia lives a life most dream of. She lives in a house in one of the most desirable areas of London with big windows overlooking the park. She is a famous painter, and her husband Gabrielle is an in-demand fashion photographer. Her life is seemingly perfect. That is until one evening when Gabriel returns home late from a fashion shoot and Alicia shoots him five times in the face, and then never speaks another word.
Alicia’s refusal to talk, or give any kind of explanation, turns a domestic tragedy into something far grander, a mystery that captures the public imagination and turns Alicia into a notorious figure. The price of her art skyrockets, and she, the silent patient, is hidden away from the tabloids and spotlight at the Grove, a secure forensic unit in North London.
Enter Theo Faber, a forensic psychotherapist, who has a long-standing desire to work with Alicia, to get her to talk and unravel the mystery of what happened that night.

The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

At a gala party thrown by her parents, Evelyn Hardcastle will be killed. Again. She’s been murdered hundreds of times, and each day, Aiden Bishop is too late to save her. Doomed to repeat the same day over and over, Aiden’s only escape is to solve Evelyn Hardcastle’s murder and conquer the shadows of an enemy he struggles to even comprehend. But nothing and no one are quite what they seem.

Family Trust

A sharp and smart comedic family drama in the vein of The Nest based in California’s Silicon Valley about a Chinese immigrant family’s attempts (or not) to fulfill its dying patriarch’s last bequest.

Witness: Lessons From Elie Wiesel’s Classroom

The world remembers Elie Wiesel—Nobel laureate, activist, and author of more than forty books, including Oprah’s Book Club selection Night—as a great humanist. He passed away in July 2016. Ariel Burger first met Elie Wiesel at age fifteen. They studied and taught together. Witness chronicles the intimate conversations between these two men over decades, as Burger sought counsel on matters of intellect, spirituality, and faith, while navigating his own personal journey from boyhood to manhood, from student and assistant to rabbi and, in time, teacher. In this profoundly hopeful, thought-provoking, and inspiring book, Burger takes us into Elie Wiesel’s classroom, where the art of listening and storytelling conspire to keep memory alive. As Wiesel’s teaching assistant, Burger gives us a front-row seat witnessing these remarkable exchanges in and out of the classroom. The act of listening, of sharing these stories, makes of us, the readers, witnesses.

Friday Black

From the start of this extraordinary debut, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s writing will grab you, haunt you, enrage and invigorate you. By placing ordinary characters in extraordinary situations, Adjei-Brenyah reveals the violence, injustice, and painful absurdities that black men and women contend with every day in this country.
These stories tackle urgent instances of racism and cultural unrest, and explore the many ways we fight for humanity in an unforgiving world. In “The Finkelstein Five,” Adjei-Brenyah gives us an unforgettable reckoning of the brutal prejudice of our justice system. In “Zimmer Land,” we see a far-too-easy-to-believe imagining of racism as sport. And “Friday Black” and “How to Sell a Jacket as Told by IceMan” show the horrors of consumerism and the toll it takes on us all.
Entirely fresh in its style and perspective, and sure to appeal to fans of Colson Whitehead, Marlon James, and George Saunders, Friday Black confronts readers with a complicated, insistent, wrenching chorus of emotions, the final note of which, remarkably, is hope.

We Shall See the Sky Sparkling

Susana Aikin’s debut is an epic historical novel set in turn-of-the-20th-century London and Vladivostok, against the backdrop of the Russo-Japanese War and the emergence of the Bolshevik revolution, which follows the exploits of Lily, a talented young actress disinherited by her father, who reaches great artistic heights on the London stage, only to be betrayed and whirled into a romance with a Russian count with whom she absconds to faraway Siberia. Lily, who is passionate about the stage and ambitious to succeed, refuses throughout to surrender to Edwardian expectations demanded of a young woman: she is raped and later further betrayed by her London co-star Wade; falls in love with but abandons the good-hearted Chut; meets a crowd of royal revolutionaries in St. Petersburg; follows Sergei, the father of her child, to Vladivostok, where she loses both Sergei and her baby in the aftermath of war. She finally reconnects as a mature, wizened woman with an older and still-ardent Chut, with whom she returns to London to set up an independent theater venue. The book is loosely based on the author’s great grand-aunt’s story, a theatrical dancer who traveled to St. Petersburg and Vladivostok with a Russian lover and later returned to Manchester in 1904 to die of tuberculosis at the age of 24.

Freefall

A propulsive debut novel for readers of Gone Girl and Before the Fall about survival at all costs and the unbreakable bond between a mother and daughter.