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The Lion Seeker

Are you a stupid or a clever?

Such is the refrain in Isaac Helger’s mind as he makes his way from redheaded hooligan to searching adolescent to striving young man on the make. His mother’s question haunts every choice and action. Are you a stupid or a clever? Will you find a way to lift your family out of Johannesburg’s poor inner city, to buy a house in the suburbs, to bring your aunts and cousins from Lithuania? The Lion Seeker brings to life South Africa, its Jewish community, its energy and brawny vernacular, as Isaac struggles toward his goals against the specter of a dark family secret and against his own impetuous temper and sensuous nature. A profoundly moral exploration of how wider social forces act on families and individuals, it is the kind of epic, coming-of-age, mother-son narrative in line with the work of Mordechai Richler, Leon Uris, Philip Roth, and more recently David Grossman. We are caught—challenged, sympathetic, hearts open and wrecked—between the urgent ambitions of a mother who knows what it takes to survive and a son straining against the responsibilities of the old world, even as he is endowed with the freedoms of the new.

The Rosie Project

Don Tillman, a professor of genetics, has a brilliant scientific mind, but social situations confound him. He’s never had a second date. And so, in the evidence-based manner in which he approaches all things, he embarks upon the Wife Project: a sixteen-page questionnaire to find the perfect partner. Then in walks Rosie Jarman. Rosie is on a quest of her own. She’s looking for her biological father, a search that a certain genetics expert might just be able to help her with. Soon Don puts the Wife Project on the back burner in order to help Rosie pursue the Father Project. As their unlikely relationship blooms, Don realizes that love doesn’t always add up on paper.

Blowback

The start of a contemporary international thriller series, by real-life ex–CIA operative Valerie Plame—author of the New York Times bestseller Fair Game—and suspense writer Sarah Lovett.

Valerie Plame’s career as a CIA operative was cut short when her cover was blown by George W. Bush’s White House. Now, after dedicating herself to protecting the nation from its enemies, Plame turns to fiction with suspense writer Sarah Lovett—delivering all the knowledge, experience, and authenticity only they can bring to the page. In Blowback, the first book in a major new series, undercover CIA agent Vanessa Pierson tries to pinpoint just who is building a nuclear weapon in Iran—and how this shadowy figure has discovered the identities of several of her sources and had them assassinated. And she’s getting closer, putting her cover and her career—and her life—at risk.

With locales spanning from Washington, D.C., to Vienna to Prague to Tehran, Blowback marks the beginning of the hunt for terrorist Bhoot, the world’s most notorious dealer of black-market WMDs, and the villain Vanessa Pierson devotes her life to capturing, dead or alive.

The Edge of Normal

In many ways, Reeve LeClaire looks like a typical twenty-two year old girl. She’s finally landed her own apartment, she waitresses to pay the bills, and she wishes she wasn’t so nervous around new people. She thinks of herself as agile, not skittish. As serious, not grim. But Reeve is anything but normal. Ten years ago, she was kidnapped and held captive. After a lucky escape, she’s spent the last six years trying to rebuild her life, a recovery thanks in large part to her indispensable therapist Dr. Ezra Lerner. But when he asks her to help another girl rescued from a similar situation, Reeve realizes she may not simply need to mentor this young victim—she may be the only one who can protect her from a cunning predator who is still out there, watching every move. From the author of the #1 non-fiction bestseller Perfect Victim: The True Story of the Girl in the Box comes a novel that draws you into a chilling and engrossing world. With powerfully gripping characters and an ending that is a masterpiece of deception, Carla Norton’s The Edge of Normal is a stunning debut thriller.

Burial Rites

A brilliant literary debut, inspired by a true story: the final days of a young woman accused of murder in Iceland in 1829. Hannah Kent brings to vivid life the story of Agnes, who, charged with the brutal murder of her former master, is sent to an isolated farm to await execution. Riveting and rich with lyricism, Burial Rites evokes a dramatic existence in a distant time and place, and asks the question, how can one woman hope to endure when her life depends upon the stories told by others?

Just What Kind of Mother Are You?

Lisa Kallisto—an overwhelmed working mother—is the not-so-perfect model of the modern woman. She holds down a busy job running the local animal shelter, she cares for three demanding children, and she worries that her marriage is not getting enough attention. During an impossibly hectic week, Lisa takes her eye off the ball for just a moment, and her whole world descends into a living nightmare. Not only is her best friend’s thirteen-year-old daughter missing, but it is all Lisa’s fault. And to make matters worse, Lucinda is the second teenage girl to disappear in the past two weeks. The first one turned up stripped bare and abandoned on the main street after a horrible ordeal. Wracked with guilt over her mistake, and having been publicly blamed by Lucinda’s family, Lisa sets out to right the wrong. But as she begins digging under the surface, Lisa learns that everything is not quite what it first appears to be. In Paula Daly’s heart-stopping and heartbreaking debut novel, motherhood, marriage, and friendship are tested when a string of horrifying abductions tear through a small-town community. Just What Kind of Mother Are You? is a gut-wrenching thriller and a shrewd examination of family life—and the deception that can lie beneath

The People in the Trees

Readers of exciting, challenging and visionary literary fiction—including admirers of Norman Rush’s Mating, Ann Patchett’s State of Wonder, Barbara Kingsolver’s The Poisonwood Bible, and Peter Matthiessen’s At Play in the Fields of the Lord—will be drawn to this astonishingly gripping and accomplished first novel. A decade in the writing, this is an anthropological adventure story that combines the visceral allure of a thriller with a profound and tragic vision of what happens when cultures collide. It is a book that instantly catapults Hanya Yanagihara into the company of young novelists who really, really matter.

In 1950, a young doctor called Norton Perina signs on with the anthropologist Paul Tallent for an expedition to the remote Micronesian island of Ivu’ivu in search of a rumored lost tribe. They succeed, finding not only that tribe but also a group of forest dwellers they dub “The Dreamers,” who turn out to be fantastically long-lived but progressively more senile. Perina suspects the source of their longevity is a hard-to-find turtle; unable to resist the possibility of eternal life, he kills one and smuggles some meat back to the States. He scientifically proves his thesis, earning worldwide fame and the Nobel Prize, but he soon discovers that its miraculous property comes at a terrible price. As things quickly spiral out of his control, his own demons take hold, with devastating personal consequences.

On Such a Full Sea

From the beloved award-winning author of Native Speaker and The Surrendered, a highly provocative, deeply affecting story of one woman’s legendary quest in a shocking, future America.

On Such a Full Sea takes Chang-rae Lee’s elegance of prose, his masterly storytelling, and his long-standing interests in identity, culture, work, and love, and lifts them to a new plane. Stepping from the realistic and historical territories of his previous work, Lee brings us into a world created from scratch. Against a vividly imagined future America, Lee tells a stunning, surprising, and riveting story that will change the way readers think about the world they live in.

In a future, long-declining America, society is strictly stratified by class. Long-abandoned urban neighborhoods have been repurposed as high-walled, self-contained labor colonies. And the members of the labor class—descendants of those brought over en masse many years earlier from environmentally ruined provincial China—find purpose and identity in their work to provide pristine produce and fish to the small, elite, satellite charter villages that ring the labor settlement.

In this world lives Fan, a female fish-tank diver, who leaves her home in the B-Mor settlement (once known as Baltimore), when the man she loves mysteriously disappears. Fan’s journey to find him takes her out of the safety of B-Mor, through the anarchic Open Counties, where crime is rampant with scant governmental oversight, and to a faraway charter village, in a quest that will soon become legend to those she left behind.

That Part Was True

When Eve Petworth writes to Jackson Cooper to praise a scene in one of his books, they discover a mutual love of cooking and food. Their friendship blossoms against the backdrop of Jackson’s colorful, but ultimately unsatisfying, love life and Eve’s tense relationship with her soon-to-be married daughter. As each of them offers, from behind the veils of semi-anonymity and distance, wise and increasingly affectionate counsel to the other, they both begin to confront their problems and plan a celebratory meeting in Paris—a meeting that Eve fears can never happen.

Someone Else’s Love Story

The beloved and highly acclaimed New York Times bestselling author makes her William Morrow debut with this fierce and funny, heartbreaking and deeply human love story—with a twist.

Someone Else’s Love Story is Joshilyn Jackson’s funny, charming, and poignant novel about science and miracles, secrets and truths, faith and forgiveness; about a virgin birth, a sacrifice, and a resurrection; about falling in love, and learning that things aren’t always what they seem—or what we hope they will be. It’s a novel about discovering what we want and ultimately finding what we need.